Aimless Google searches

In which I look for random images.

I have a little game I like to play, it is called Image Roulette. The rules to this game are very simple, but it is an endless source of enjoyment (and as you will see potential IT policy breaches). The basic premise is to see what a simple image search on Google can produce.

I’m pretty good at Google, I even have a certificate in Power Searching from them, and I consider it a matter of pride that I can answer most things within a few different queries. I even use the advanced tools like colour and time. This is why I find it fun to play Image Roulette, because I know the odds be ever in my favour.

To play this game you simply need:

  • A device that connects to Google Image Search
  • A gullible fool to toy with

Continue reading “Aimless Google searches”

Encarta

Before the internet there were libraries, and before Wikipedia we had the Encyclopedia Britannica. Yet for a few short years between the two we had Encarta.

It seems strange now that we would use a cd-rom for answers to any questions on science, history or geography. The growth of Wikipedia and it’s mass of information on subjects as varied as obscure wrestling stars, tall buildings in Kazakhstan or legendary Welsh Kings has spoilt us. We no longer have to research or use and index. A simple Google search replaces the need to cross reference anything.

No citation needed

At the start of the home computer boom in the 90s nobody had yet thought about using the, ahem, “wisdom of the masses” to crowd source a trove of knowledge. Very few people even had a basic access to the internet let alone the infrastructure to be able to collaborate. This was still Web 1.0.

Before the internet there were libraries, and before Wikipedia we had the Encyclopedia Britannica. Yet for a few short years between the two we had Encarta.

It seems strange now that we would use a cd-rom for answers to any questions on science, history or geography. The growth of Wikipedia and it’s mass of information on subjects as varied as obscure wrestling stars, tall buildings in Kazakhstan or legendary Welsh Kings has spoilt us. We no longer have to research or use and index. A simple Google search replaces the need to cross reference anything.

 

No citation needed

At the start of the home computer boom in the 90s nobody had yet thought about using the, ahem, “wisdom of the masses” to crowd source a trove of knowledge. Very few people even had a basic access to the internet let alone the infrastructure to be able to collaborate. This was still Web 1.0.

Continue reading “Encarta”